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At this point Kane, then 19, "grabbed her and began fondling and kissing her," and Doe "was unable to fight back because she had been drugged," the suit states.

Kane then purportedly "grabbed her arm and forced her back to his dorm room" where he "repeatedly and brutally raped, sodomized, and forced (Doe) to orally copulate him until she vomited, for approximately five hours." When she left, Doe was "battered, bruised, and bloodied" and "her shorts, once white, were now crimson with her own blood." By the end of the 2013 school year, Doe had dropped out of VWC and entered in-patient treatment for anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and depression.

As a direct result of this negligence, the lawsuit states, Doe "suffered excruciating physical injury and pain, and has and will suffer extraordinary psychiatric injury." In echoes of article about the now-infamous University of Virginia (UVA) rape case, Doe's lawsuit suggests that "the college knew that male students were drugging female students, rendering them incapacitated, and raping them, and yet did nothing." Furthermore, campus police should have been able to recognize Doe's "helpless condition" when she entered Kane's dormitory and intervened, it says, and so should have the campus security guard who saw her passing by afterward with bloody shorts.

But there's much more to this story than what's being reported by and ran with by other online media.

For starters, the victim—identified only as Jane Doe—has filed a civil lawsuit against the college, alleging gross negligence and seeking million in damages.

There's a lot of outrage going around over a request from Virginia Wesleyan College (VWC) that a former student who claims she was raped now provide a list of past sexual partners and boyfriends.

After reading briefly about the case, I was set to write a short post reminding people how campus rape investigations—which seem to show that: after VWC found the accused guilty of sexual misconduct and expelled him, it subsequently changed his status to "voluntarily withdrawn" in order to "assist him in seeking further studies." This paradox is one of many reasons why treating campus rape as an academic infraction rather than a serious criminal matter makes little sense.

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